“Big Brother”: Palm Beach Gardens’ Tiffany Rousso targeted for eviction

Tiffany Rousso of the CBS series BIG BROTHER, scheduled to air on the CBS Television Network.   Photo: Monty Brinton/CBS ©2016 CBS Broadcasting, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Tiffany Rousso of the CBS series BIG BROTHER, scheduled to air on the CBS Television Network. Photo: Monty Brinton/CBS ©2016 CBS Broadcasting, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Well, that’s not the way to make friends and influence people. Well, not a good influence, anyway.

Tiffany Rousso, the Palm Beach Gardens teacher/sister of previous “Big Brother” houseguest Vanessa, kinda blew up her game last week because she just couldn’t be cool. Not Fonzie cool – the kind of cool that allows you to calm down enough to let a plan work and not make your partners in the plan think you’re a loose cannon who’s gotta go.

To wit – the members of her alliance asked her to go up on the block last week as a ruse, but it triggered the same paranoia that her sister had. She got sketchy. She kept asking people if they were really trying to kick her. They kept telling her no, until she made them so nuts that they were like “You know what? Have a seat. Over in the ‘You about to get booted’ section.” Unless she wins the Power of Veto, or someone else makes themselves a bigger target, she might go bye-bye.

A side note: Am I the only one who hears them say “Power of Veto” and thinks they hear “Power of Vito?” Who is Vito? Where does he power come from? What is wrong with me?

I have to address something else right quick: Apparently the live feeds have woven a tale of Frank, a returning player that I was starting to think was cute, and his inability to know when his jokes had gone too far. Specifically, he’d pushed Da’Vonne, previously a fan of his, to tears because he thought that calling her a slut and smacking her butt was in good fun, and she did not. Frank, as we used to say at home, plays too much. When she cried to the camera that she couldn’t let her daughter watching at home believe that this is how you talk to a woman, that this is how she should allow herself to be treated. The events of the last week, of which Da’Vonne and Frank are seemingly unaware, are even more of a signal that we need to respect each other, to listen to each other and read each other’s cues and say “Are they understanding what I’m trying to say?” Frank’s face, when he realized that he’d not only hurt Da’Vonne’s feelings but that his whole persona was being taken wrong, was pretty heartbreaking.

Da’Vonne accepted his apology. But the damage is done.